Ever Wish for a Book Boyfriend

This is purely for fun. Click here to create your own book boyfriend (be patient and wait for the “Get Started” message to appear at the bottom of the screen). Answer a few questions or put in keywords and, soon, you will be matched with the type of hero that you enjoy reading about in novels.

You can request periodic email notes from your book boyfriend with suggestions on books that feature your kind of hero. Clever idea. I hope it works out. I guess it depends on the size of the book database. Maybe my book boyfriend will suggest one of my own books back to me. How exciting!

I was greedy and created two book boyfriends, one is a sabre-wielding regimental soldier (pictured here; source: BuildaBookBoyfriend.com) and one is a pistol-dueling peer of the realm. Yours can be from present day or even from the future.

Let me know if you try it out and what your results are.

Presenting Lady Gus

Cover of Presenting Lady GusThe tale of how Presenting Lady Gus came to be is this: I sat down and started writing what I thought was a medieval, but the characters were speaking in Georgian English. I put it aside after 30,000 words and basically forgot about it. That’s me!

A few months ago, when my fellow writers at LoveHistoricals.com needed another story for our latest boxed set, I really wanted to be in it. I was poking around my pc and there was the folder labeled “Augusta.” I quickly realized that I had been sorely mistaken and that this was much closer to a Regency than a medieval. Soon, the tale of Augusta and Rolf flowed, and with another 18,000 words written, the story practically finished itself. (Oh, there may have been some hair-pulling and brow-furrowing on my part.)

The Love Historicals boxed set is not out yet, but Presenting Lady Gus is.

Synopsis:

Augusta Brenville needs a husband, preferably a wealthy one, to save her beloved estate. Unfortunately, holding onto her inheritance seems impossible when nary a suitor remains standing, nor alive for that matter! That is until a seasoned captain arrives, daring and intrepid . . . and a tad uncivilized for the lady’s liking.

For the sake of owning Thornbury Castle, Captain Rolf is willing to marry its rather awkward yet endearing mistress, regardless of her penniless state. First, however, he must thwart an assassin with a penchant for poison, fire, and arrows. Can he keep both himself and his betrothed alive until their wedding day?

I love the cover created by Philip Ré of REX Video Productions. Even more so because the happy couple is standing in front of the real Thornbury Castle featured in their story.

Presenting Lady Gus is available at Smashwords by clicking below. Also available everywhere digital books are sold, including Amazon, Kobo, iTunes, and Barnes & Noble.

A Look-Ahead to 2017 from a Writer’s POV

Kristen Lamb’s post “After the Dumpster Fire of 2016—How to Make 2017 ROCK!” is an inspirational look-ahead for writers and how to accomplish more and better writing in the new year.

new year graphic

One thing you should be doing is reading. After all reading books is probably what brought you to the craft of writing in the first place.  A quote from Kristen, for writers about reading, especially if you swear you don’t have the time:

Reading is how we hone our skills and learn. I do a lot of editing and one of my biggest complaints with new writers is it is clear they do not read. They beat up a lot of the same words, the same tired descriptions and their dialogue sounds like a bad soap opera. Often I can tell in less than ten pages they have no plot.

But these are the same folks who will claim they have no time to read.

I read about three books a week. No I don’t sit with a nice hard back the way I would prefer. I listen to audio books and it isn’t my preference but it works with all I have to do. I can’t sit and leisurely page through while folding laundry. I can, however, listen to an audio book and with Kindle Unlimited and an Audible membership I can afford my habit.

No, not all writers are plotters, but I will be blunt. Pansters really are plotters but the reason they can get away with not sitting and outlining is they literally have read so many books that structure is hardwired into their brains and they can navigate a 60,000-110,000 word story intuitively.

Successful pantsers are extremely well read (plotters too but pantsers even more so).

If we don’t spend time reading, we will probably spend way more time with crappy drafts. Most people are not born writing savants. Stephen King didn’t become Stephen King without reading fiction and using others to refine his craft.

You can read the post in its entirety here.

Enjoy!